MAKING WORD LISTS FROM READING

Audio blog post by Dr. Isaacs. Click to listen and read along! There is a huge argument to be made from the benefits of reading when trying to become an expert speller. Simply put, reading will expose you to a wide variety of words. And unlike poring over simple word lists, reading will improve your vocabulary. Why? Because you see a word in its proper context. Even if you can't learn the exact dictionary definition of a word, you often get a clue as to what it means. If you…

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THE ADJECTIVE SUFFIXES -CEOUS / -CIOUS / -TIOUS

Audio blog post by Dr. Isaacs. Click to listen and read along! For many spellers, the three adjective suffixes -ceous / -cious / -tious can provide a world of confusion. The main reason is that all three have the same pronunciation: \shəs\. With this post, I hope the confusion can end, once and for all. These three adjective suffixes can actually be differentiated quite simply. (This rule is certainly more straightforward than the rules dictating -able vs. -ible!) -ceous This suffix, which is Latin in origin, is almost exclusively preceded…

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-ABLE VS. -IBLE – PART 4

Spelling correctly is possible street sign

Audio blog post by Dr. Isaacs. Click to listen and read along! Well! We've reached the end! Almost. So far, we've explored three aspects of the -able/-ible spelling conundrum. We've learned that -able is, by far, the more common of the two suffixes - and therefore, a better choice if you're guessing a spelling. We've learned that if you can think of a similar suffix to add to the end of a word, the first letter of that similar suffix should point the way to the correct choice of -able…

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-ABLE VS. -IBLE – PART 3

Audio blog post by Dr. Isaacs. Click to listen and read along! Whew! This is a long-winded answer to such a fundamental spelling question, right? Well, we have revealed some good insights on how to tackle this most troublesome of suffixes. Let's attack the words that end in -able. We'll finish the -ible words in our next and final post. Words that end in -able: the most basic rule Usually, if you have a word in English, you can just add the suffix -able, and you'll be in good shape.…

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-ABLE VS. -IBLE – PART 2

Audio blog post by Dr. Isaacs. Click to listen and read along! In Part 1 of this post, we established that, purely from a statistical perspective, if confronted with a word that may end in -able or -ible, you'd be much better off guessing -able. But spellers are not necessarily statisticians. So let's go to a more linguistic argument. Similar suffixes and -ible One reliable way to determine which suffix to spell involves looking at other suffixes. Let's say, for the sake of argument, that you're looking at the word…

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-ABLE VS. -IBLE – PART 1

Hard to decide whether to spell -ible or -able

Audio blog post by Dr. Isaacs. Click to listen and read along! Welcome to what is probably the one spelling question spellers ask me more than any other. If you get a word that ends in what the dictionary shows as \əbəl\, do you spell it -able or -ible? For example, is it corrodable or corrodible? Acceptable or acceptible? Divisable or divisible? And once you figure out which of the spellings is correct...why is it correct? And how can we apply a pattern or a rule to other words for…

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SPELLING COMPOUND WORDS

Audio blog post by Dr. Isaacs. Click to listen and read along! The English language - and by this, I mean pure English, not touched by Latin or French or any other language - loves its compound words. (For that matter, so do other Germanic languages, like Dutch and German.) These are words created simply by putting two words together. Sometimes, one of these original words may not be very common, but the compound word that contains it is common. Most of the time, the spelling of each of the…

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SPELLING RULES – A DISCLAIMER

Audio blog post by Dr. Isaacs. Click to listen and read along! Spelling in the English language is one of the most difficult academic skills to master. Part of the issue is that words in English come from all over the world. Literally. Name a language, and chances are it has contributed directly or indirectly to English. To make spelling easier, many people rely on rules. However, virtually every rule in the English language has an exception! For example, how about that one spelling rule virtually everyone knows? "I before…

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A FOND FAREWELL TO SPELL IT

Audio blog post by Dr. Isaacs. Click to listen and read along! In 2007, the website Spell It became the official Scripps word list for millions of aspiring spellers. This website served great purposes. It was the middle ground between shorter school lists that teachers used for classroom, school, and district bees, and the daunting Merriam-Webster Unabridged. More than a list of words merely to be memorized, Spell It contained words grouped by etymology (as suggested by the above picture). This grouping facilitated learning language patterns. For example, a search…

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