PRONUNCIATION – THE CONSONANTS

Audio blog post by Dr. Isaacs. Click to listen and read along! The task of covering all of the vowel sounds in English took four blog posts. But we can cover all of the consonant sounds in just one post - and there are roughly four times as many consonants as vowels! Consonants are just more straightforward. (Besides, let's be honest. You probably already know these.) So let's begin! Voiced vs. unvoiced consonants It may seem appropriate to list the consonants in alphabetical order, just sticking with the alphabet. But…

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PRONUNCIATION – THE DIPHTHONGS

Audio blog post by Dr. Isaacs. Click to listen and read along! (Part 1) We're at the end! We've covered long and short vowels, vowels that aren't quite either long or short, and that dreaded schwa and its partners in crime. So what do we have left? Two sounds, both with one thing in common. Let's get to it. Diphthongs Let's learn a bit about these last two sounds, and extend this lesson some. These last two sounds are diphthongs. In other words, these are the equivalent of two simple…

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PRONUNCIATION – THE SCHWA (AND ITS RELATIVES)

Audio blog post by Dr. Isaacs. Click to listen and read along! After going over the long and short vowel sounds in English - as well as some outliers - I wanted to dwell a bit on one particular sound and give it the attention it deserves. This is one of the most important, universal, and frustrating sounds in the spelling world. In phonics, we learned this as a "short u" sound (and it looked like this: ŭ). To make light of it a bit, I consider this the sound…

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PRONUNCIATION – NON-SHORT, NON-LONG VOWEL SOUNDS

Audio blog post by Dr. Isaacs. Click to listen and read along! Long and short vowels cover many vowel sounds in English...but not all of them! There are many more vowel sounds that Merriam-Webster Unabridged Online acknowledges. Let's explore some of them. The short o sounds If you studied phonics in grade school, you may remember the short o, as in the word lot. (It looked like this: ŏ.) Merriam Webster actually splits this sound into two distinct sounds. Though these sounds are still quite similar, it is good to…

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